FAQs

Having a Dentbros Puppy – All you need to know

Two of my pups (from different litters)

Two of my pups (from different litters)

How often do you have litters?

Not very often!  I aim to have one litter per year, but that rarely works, meaning I either have two litters in a year or none at all – it depends when the bitch’s seasons fall and how that fits in with other events in my life.  It’s a hobby for me.

How many litters does each of your dogs have?

I aim to have a maximum of three litters per dog, starting between two and three years of age and having a litter every two years.  Again, it depends on the dogs and what else is happening.

How do you choose your Stud Dogs?

They must also be bred for better temperament and health, just like my own girls.  I need to know that they are loving, loved, pet dogs who are fit for purpose.  In other words they must be healthy dogs with strong breed lines and in good shape.  I want to know that they are keen, ready to take on whatever is asked of them, just like mine!

How long do you keep your puppies for before they go to their new homes?

8 weeks.  I do not like keeping them for longer, as they are hard work!  But will occasionally cover a holiday, if it is pre-booked.

Are they vaccinated before they go?

No.  Vets use different vaccination types, with different lengths of time between the first and second injection.  The puppies are covered by their mothers’ immunity until eight weeks of age, so it’s much better if you take them to your own vets as soon as they arrive with you.

What health tests do they have?

The puppies will have been eye tested for CEA and their hearing will be checked; these tests are carried out at the Animal Health Trust in Newmarket, at the age of six weeks.  They will be microchipped and wormed.  They will be KC registered.

Dentbros Border Collies are eye and hearing tested, hip scored and DNA tested Normal for CEA, CL and TNS. I only use stud dogs who have been hip scored, eye tested and DNA tested Normal for CEA, CL and TNS.  Pedigrees will be endorsed ‘Progeny not eligible for Registration’ and ‘Not eligible for export pedigree’. This is to protect the puppies and the future of the breed. The breeding restriction will be lifted on production of an adult eye certificate and below average hip score.

What do you provide with each puppy?

Each puppy comes with a full puppy pack, giving you copies of all the parents’ health tests and certificates and guidance on feeding, toileting, training etc.  You will have a small amount of food and the option to buy a sack of food.  They each come with a toy covered in familiar smells, which helps them to settle into their new home.

Are they used to children, cats and other dogs?

My Border Collie puppies are reared in the home and well socialised to give them the best possible start in life.  They are born in my bedroom and move downstairs to the kitchen when they are up and about.  They are handled (cuddled) every day and will be introduced to our cat and other dogs.  They will have masses of time to play outside (they like to do a spot of gardening).  They will be handled by plenty of young children, so by the time they reach you at eight weeks of age they will be confident, outgoing, sociable dogs.

How much do you charge?

Border collies are not expensive as a breed, because they are known to be highly strung, nervous and difficult to manage.  My puppies are none of those things, provided they are correctly raised and managed in their new homes.  I know that they will leave me as confident, outgoing, sociable dogs who will bring years of happiness to their new families.  My puppies are usually given to family and friends, although occasionally there may be one available for other people.  I ask for something to help cover the costs incurred in raising my pedigree border collies, because they have the best of everything.  IMG_7608How do I apply for a puppy?

If you are interested in having a puppy from me, you can fill in a Puppy application form. This will tell me a bit about yourself and what sort of home you can offer. If you haven’t got the time to do this, then you haven’t got the time for a Border Collie. I need to know something about you, before discussing the possibility of you having one of my puppies.  A great deal of time and commitment is put into rearing and socialising my puppies and I only want the best for them so please do not be offended if I ask you lots of questions.

What makes an ideal home?

I prefer my puppies to go to family homes, as they make brilliant pets.  As they are Border Collies I do like them to be given the opportunity to do some training, whether in obedience, agility, flyball or any other dog activity.  However, I have decided that I prefer them not to go to ‘working’ homes, as they have been lovingly bred and raised in my home and I want them to enjoy family life – they must be pets first.

I provide a life-long commitment to all the puppies I breed and if you are no longer able to keep the dog for whatever reason I ask that you contact me first.  More information about buying a puppy is available on the Kennel Club website or from Champdogs

What do I do now?

Please contact me for more information, or you can fill in a Puppy application form.

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